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Introduction to TSO



Table of Contents

1.     Introduction

    1.1         What is TSO?

    1.2         Connecting to TSO

    1.3         Logging on to TSO

    1.4         Logging off TSO

    1.5         Learning TSO

2.    Using ISPF

    2.1         Panels

    2.2         Panel Format

    2.3         Types Of Panels

    2.4         Program Function Keys

    2.5         ISPF Settings

    2.6         ISPF Action Bar

    2.7         Log and List Data Sets

    2.6         Jump Panels (Menu Bypass)

    2.7         Split Screen Mode

3.     Data Sets

    3.1         Data Set Types

    3.2         Data Set Naming Conventions

4.     Editing Files

    4.1         Edit Panel

    4.2         Scrolling

    4.3         Editing

    4.4         Edit Line Commands

        4.4.1             Insert Lines

        4.4.2             Repeat Lines

        4.4.3             Delete Lines

        4.4.4             Exclude Lines

        4.4.5             Copy Lines

        4.4.6             Move Lines

        4.4.7             Destinations

        4.4.8             Text Preparation

        4.4.9             Line Labels

    4.5         Primary Commands

        4.5.1             AUTONUM - Automatic Renumber

        4.5.2             AUTOSAVE - Automatic Save

        4.5.3             BOUNDS - Set Column Boundaries

        4.5.4             CANCEL - Exit Without Saving Changes

        4.5.5             CAPS - Set Upper-Lower Case

        4.5.6             CHANGE - Change Text

        4.5.7             COPY - Copy from an External File

        4.5.8             CREATE - Create an External File

        4.5.9             DELETE - Delete Lines

        4.5.10             DOWN - Scroll Down

        4.5.11             END - Exit Editor

        4.5.12             EXCLUDE - Hide Lines

        4.5.13             FIND - Search for Text

        4.5.14             HELP - Display Help Information

        4.5.15             HEX - Display Data in Hexadecimal

        4.5.16             LEFT - Scroll Left

        4.5.17             LOCATE - Scroll to a Specific Line

        4.5.18             MOVE - Move Lines

        4.5.19             NONUMBER - Set Line Numbers Off

        4.5.20             NULLS - Control Trailing Blanks

        4.5.21             NUMBER - Control Line Numbers

        4.5.22             PROFILE - Control Default Settings

        4.5.23             RCHANGE - Repeat CHANGE Command

        4.5.24             RECOVERY - Control Edit Recovery

        4.5.25             RENUM - Renumber Lines

        4.5.26             REPLACE - Replace External File

        4.5.27             RESET - Reset Data Display

        4.5.28             RFIND - Repeat FIND Command

        4.5.29             RIGHT - Scroll Right

        4.5.30             SAVE - Save Data in External File

        4.5.31             SORT - Sort Lines

        4.5.32             STATS - Control Library Statistics

        4.5.33             SUBMIT - Submit Batch Job

        4.5.34             UNDO - Undo Previous Edit

        4.5.35             UNNUMBER - Remove Line Numbers

        4.5.36             UP - Scroll Up

5.     Utilities

6.     Working with Batch Job Output

    6.1         IOF

    6.2         Invoking IOF

    6.3         Input Jobs

    6.4         Running Jobs

    6.5         Output Jobs

    6.6         Looking at your job output

    6.7         Printing part of your job

    6.8         Saving output to a data set

    6.9         Canceling your job

    6.10         Leaving IOF

    6.11         Online Help and Tutorial

APPENDIX A     Browse Commands Syntax Summary

APPENDIX B     Edit Line Commands Syntax Summary

APPENDIX C     Edit Primary Comamnds Syntax Summary

APPENDIX D     Transferring Files between the Mainframe and PC

APPENDIX E     Converting Wylbur libraries and data sets






Chapter 1



Introduction

1.1 What is TSO?

TSO (Time Sharing Option) allows the computer user to interact with the MVS operating system on the UND mainframe computer system to execute programs (both batch and interactive) and manage program output.

Within TSO, there are several environments that provide an easy, user-friendly interface of menus and data entry screens:

ISPF (Interactive System Productivity Facility) is a menu-driven shell which simplifies using TSO. ISPF assists you in managing your files and provides an interface to access other software on the mainframe.

PDF (Program Development Facility) is a full-screen interactive editor. You can also submit batch jobs from PDF.

IOF (Interactive Output Facility) is a utility for monitoring batch jobs, viewing batch job output, and printing or purging batch job output.

1.2 Connecting to TSO

You can use the same communications software to connect to TSO that you use to connect to CICS, e.g., TCP3270 for Windows. At the TN3270 connect screen, press TAB key (three times) to Application: field, type: utso and press ENTER. (For assistance in creating a tso profile, contact your local computer center.)

1.3 Logging on to TSO

After establishing connection to the mainframe, you will see a prompt for your userid. Type your TSO userid and press enter. (Contact your local computer center to obtain a TSO logon.) You should see the TSO/E Logon screen. The cursor is in the password field. Type your RACF password and press ENTER. Several lines of system messages will appear on the screen. When you see three asterisks (***) press enter. You are now at the North Dakota University System Main Menu. From this screen you choose what application you wish to perform. The cursor is located after the "Select Option ===>" field. To choose an application, type the number or characters that appear in front of the application you desire. For example, to use the online tutorial, type T and press ENTER.

1.4 Logging off TSO

When you are finished working in TSO, you will return to the North Dakota University System Main Menu to log off. To return to the main menu:

Press PF3 (END) until you are back at the NDUS Main Menu, or

Type =X on any command line and press enter, or

Press PF16 (shift/PF4) (RETURN).

Now, type X and press enter. You will see a log disposition screen. While you are working on TSO, the system creates a log of your activity. Before you exit the system, you need to specify what to do with that log. Generally you will specify to delete the log without printing (option 2). When you press enter you will see the READY prompt. Now you can type LOGOFF and press ENTER.

Notes:

You are advised not to disconnect from the mainframe by clicking on the close box in upper right corner of TCP3270 window.

If your TSO session is inactive for a period of 30 minutes, the system will disconnect you. You will need to reconnect to the mainframe.

1.5 Learning TSO

Learning a new system can be quite overwhelming! There is a variety of tools on TSO which can help you learn about the environment and how to use the functions:

An online tutorial for ISPF is available from the NDUS Main Menu. Just type T and press ENTER. From the tutorial you can choose to view topics in the order presented or choose the topic you are interested in.

Several CBT (Computer Based Tutorials) courses are available for ISPF and REXX (an application used to create your own programs). To access these tutorials, from the ISPF Primary Option Menu, choose option 6 (Command). At the ===> prompt, type:
crwth c(xxxxxx)
where "xxxxxx" is replaced with the course name. The course names include:

SPFPD1 Using ISPF/PDF: Fundamentals of Data Management

SPFPD2 Using ISPF/PDF: Advanced Features

REXTSO TSO REXX Application Programming

Contact your local computer center for availability of workbooks that can be used with these tutorials.

Online Help is available throughout TSO and its components with the PF1 (Help) key. By placing the cursor at a command line or data entry field and pressing the PF1 key, TSO will display information from the online tutorial.

Chapter 2

Using ISPF

2.1 Panels

ISPF communicates with you through a series of predefined panels. Panels may require a response, and that response determines the next panel to be displayed or the function to be performed. Responses are case-insensitive, so upper, lower, or a mixture of the two is valid.

2.2 Panel Format

All panels are formatted to fit on a 24-line x 80-character screen, with the first four lines of each formatted as follows:

+-----------------------------+---------------+

Line 1 | Action Bar |

+-----------------------------+---------------+

Line 2 | Title |Short Message |

+-----------------------------+---------------+

Line 3 | Command/Option | Scroll |

+-----------------------------+---------------+

Line 4 | Long Message |

+---------------------------------------------+

The Action Bar displays a menu of functions on the top line of a panel.

The Title area identifies the function being performed and, where applicable, the library or data set name, member name, version number, and modification level.

The Short Message area indicates:

Current line (for Browse) and column position (for Browse and Edit)

Successful completion of a processing function

Error conditions

The Command/Option is where you enter a command or an option selection.

The Scroll area contains the current scroll amount whenever scrolling is applicable. You may overtype this area to change the default amount.

The Long Message area is used to display an explanation of error conditions upon request. Normally, this line is blank on selection panels and data entry panels, contains column headings on member lists, and is treated as part of the data area on data displays.

2.3 Types Of Panels

When using ISPF, you will use four types of panels:

1. Selection Panel - You select from a list of options by typing its identifier (letter(s) or number) on the Command/Option line and pressing ENTER. Selection panels are also called menus. The North Dakota University System Main Menu is an example of a selection panel.

2. Entry Panel - You supply parameters by filling in labeled fields. In many cases, the fields are pre-entered with what you last entered. The Edit Entry Panel is an example of an entry panel.

3. Member List - Displays a list of members in a Library (partitioned data set). You may select a member by entering a one-character code in front of the appropriate member name (for example, an "S" in the View and Edit member list panels).

4. Scrollable Data Display - Displays source code that can be manipulated with scroll commands on the Command line, or with PF Keys. The edit panel is an example of a scrollable data display panel.

2.4 Program Function Keys

Program Function (PF1, PF2, etc.) keys are designed to provide shortcuts for TSO and ISPF commands. The terminal emulator software (e.g., TCP3270 for Windows) running on your PC determines the keyboard mapping, i.e., determines which keyboard keys (F1, F2, etc.) correspond to the PF Keys defined in ISPF. Generally F1 through F12 will correspond with PF1 through PF12. If you are using TCP3270 for Windows, use the SHIFT key with an F key to emulate the PF13 through PF24 keys. E.g., PF13 can be issued by pressing the SHIFT key and F1 key.

To display the PF Key definitions, type keys and press ENTER. You can tailor the PF Key assignments as you wish from these screens.

The default PF Keys defined for ISPF are:

PF1/PF13 Help

PF2/PF14 Split screen - divide screen into two logical screens

PF3/PF15 End a function; return to previous panel

PF5/PF17 RFind - Repeat a Find command

PF6/PF18 RChange - Repeat a Change command

PF7/PF19 Scroll backward (up) - move towards top of member list or data set

PF8/PF20 Scroll forward (down) - move towards bottom of member list or data set

PF9/PF21 Swap - move between screens in split screen mode

PF10/PF22 Scroll right

PF11/PF23 Scroll left

PF12 Cancel

PF16 Return - go back to Primary menu

PF24 Retrieve - recall previous command to the command line

By default, PF keys are displayed at the bottom of a panel. The pfshow command is used to alter this display.

Type pfshow off to remove PF key definitions, thus allowing more lines for
displaying text in a scrollable screen.

Type pfshow on to display PF key definitions.

Type pfshow tailor to alter what PF keys are displayed.

2.5 ISPF Settings

You can alter your ISPF environment by choosing Option 0 from the ISPF Primary Option Menu. The ISPF Settings panel is displayed here.
Log/List Function keys Colors Environ GUI Temporary Help

ISPF Settings

Command ===>

Select Options: Print Graphics Parms:

Enter "/" to select option Family printer type 2

Command line at bottom Device name . . . .

/ Panel display CUA mode Aspect ratio . . . 0

Long message in pop-up

/ Tab to action bar choices

Tab to point-and-shoot fields General:

/ Restore TEST/TRACE options Input field pad . . N

Session Manager mode Command delimiter .

/ Jump from leader dots

Edit PRINTDS Command

The area of the ISPF Settings panel that you use most often is the "Select Options" list. Options preceded by a A/@ are ON. Options preceded by a space are OFF.

The most commonly modified option is: Command line at bottom. This places the command line at the bottom of ISPF panels. We recommend OFF to put the command line at the top.

If you make use of the action bar, you may prefer to select the Tab to action bar choices for easy access to these menus.

2.6 ISPF Action Bar

The ISPF action bar appears on most panels to provide greater access to ISPF and TSO commands. Use the TAB key, arrow keys or mouse to position the cursor before or on a function and press ENTER. A drop down menu will appear; type the number that corresponds with a desired function and press ENTER. To remove the drop down menu without making a selection, press PF3.

The screen shown here is an example of the "Function keys" drop down menu. The menu provides access to function key settings and display, as well as keylists.



















2.7 Log and List Data Sets

ISPF allocates two data sets each time you logon to record your actions during a terminal session. The Log data set is a record of major activities, such as saving data sets, submitting jobs, and deleting or copying data sets or members. The List data set stores the screen Asnapshots@, generated by any PRINT or PRINT-HI commands, as well as other output you may SAVE or send to the List data set during your ISPF session. When you Exit ISPF, you need to specify the disposition of these data sets. You can set the disposition defaults by using the Log/List function on the action bar from the ISPF Settings panel.

The Log/List drop down menu is shown below.









Usually you won't have need for the Log data set. To delete it when you exit ISPF, set the Process option to 2. (But for important data sets where you want to keep an audit trail, select option 1. Then see someone at your installation to help you fill out the information you will be prompted for.)

The List data set contains output that you requested by executing certain ISPF commands, so you will probably want the specify that the file be printed when you exit ISPF. Set the Process option to 1 (Print data set and delete). If you don=t want any output during a terminal session, don=t enter any PRINT or PRINT-HI commands.

You can process your Log or List data sets at any time during an ISPF session with one of these self-explanatory primary commands:

LIST DELETE LIST KEEP LIST PRINT

LOG DELETE LOG KEEP LOG PRINT

If you wait until leaving ISPF to process the Log/List data sets, you get a chance to review and accept or override the defaults you=ve established.

2.6 Jump Panels (Menu Bypass)

Once you become familiar with the functions and many panels within ISPF, there are several methods of skipping over menus:

Type the options of successive menus separated with periods. For example, you want to allocate a new data set. From the ISPF Primary Option Menu, you would first choose option 3 (Utilities), then option 2 (Data Set). To bypass the Utilities menu, you could type: 3.2.

Type an equal sign in front of any option found on the ISPF Primary Option Menu. From any Command line of any panel, you could type =3.2 to accomplish the same result as above.

More examples:

=X Exits ISPF

=I Go to IOF

2.7 Split Screen Mode

ISPF allows you to divide your display screen into two logical screens that operate independently of each other without ending your current function. Once your screen is split, you can move between the two screens. The screen where the cursor is located is the active screen. The other screen is not affected by anything you do in the active screen.

To enter split screen mode:

1. Move the cursor to the desired portion of the screen where you want the second screen to appear,

2. Press PF2/PF14 (Split). This will divide your screen and result in a second ISPF session where you can select ISPF functions.

Depending on the location of the cursor when you split the screen, ISPF may display all or part of the North Dakota University System Main Menu. The two screens will be separated by a highlighted dotted line.





















To move between the two screens, press the Swap PF key, usually PF9 or PF21.

To exit split screen mode and remove one of the ISPF sessions, exit from the desired screen the same way you exit ISPF:

Press PF3 (End) repeatedly until the ISPF session disappears, or

Type =X from any ISPF panel in the session you wish to end.



Chapter 3

3. Data Sets

3.1 Data Set Types

On an IBM mainframe such as the UND administrative system, you will typically work with two types of data sets: sequential and partitioned.

Sequential data set contains records that are ordered sequentially, that is one record after another. For Wylbur users, a sequential data set is a file that resides "outside" your Wylbur library.

Partitioned data set contains one or more sequential data sets grouped together. Each sequential data set is called a member of the partitioned data set. A partitioned data set is commonly referred to as a PDS. A Wylbur library is an example of a PDS.

3.2 Data Set Naming Conventions

Several data set naming conventions are used on the MVS system at UND, the two most common being TSO and WYLBUR. These conventions are subsets of the standard IBM MVS data set naming convention. Permanent data sets which you create must comply with an appropriate naming convention.

Several naming conventions are described below, beginning with the standard IBM data set naming convention. For data sets you create, you are recommended to follow TSO and UND naming conventions. The WYLBUR naming convention is included for reference purposes.

Standard IBM Naming Convention
- A data set name consists of one or more words called qualifiers.
- Each qualifier consists of 1 to 8 alphabetic, numeric, and/or national characters. (The alphabetic characters are the uppercase letters (A...Z); the numeric characters are the digits (0...9); the national characters are the dollar, pound, and commercial at signs ($#@).
- The first character of each qualifier must be either alphabetic or national.
- A period (.) is used as a separator between qualifiers.
- The overall length of the data set name, including periods, cannot exceed 44 characters.
- A member name enclosed in parentheses may be appended to the name of a partitioned data set if a member of the data set is being referenced. The member name consists of a one word qualifier. The member name and the enclosing parentheses do not count toward the 44 character length of the data set name.




TSO Naming Convention
- The Standard IBM Naming Convention and the conditions listed below are used.
- The data set name must have at least two qualifiers. (If it has exactly three qualifiers, it also conforms to the ISPF Naming Convention.)
- The first qualifier must be the userid of the data set owner.




ISPF Naming Convention
- The TSO Naming Convention is used, except the data set name must have exactly three qualifiers.




WYLBUR Naming Convention
- The Standard IBM Naming Convention and the conditions listed below are used, except the national characters ($#@) should not be used in the data set name nor in the member name.
- The data set names must have at least five qualifiers.
- The first qualifier must be WYL
- The second qualifier must be USR
- The third qualifier must be the first two characters of the userid which owns the data set.
- The fourth qualifier must be the last three characters of the userid which owns the data set.
- A fifth qualifier is required; additional qualifiers beyond the fifth are optional.
- WYLBUR permits the qualifiers of data set names to have more than 8 characters and to have non-standard characters. Use of non-standard data set names is strongly discouraged.
- A member name follows the same rules as listed for Standard IBM Naming Convention, except that other characters are also allowed; however, these other characters are not permitted if the member name is to be referenced in a non-WYLBUR environment, such as TSO or batch. The WYLBUR environment permits two methods of designating a member name: enclosing the member name in parentheses or preceding the member name with a pound sign (#); the latter method is valid only in a WYLBUR environment.


Additional data set naming conventions have been created by the UND Computer Center to ease the process of allocating new data sets and incorporate storage management processes. Default characteristics will be supplied for you based on the name you select for your data set. The Data Class and Management Class will also be supplied for you. These data set naming conventions MUST be followed. Data sets not conforming to these conventions are subject to deletion. If you should need a data set name that does not follow these conventions, please contact the HECN Coordinator on your campus or User Services at UND. Additional naming conventions will be added as necessary.

These are the present UND Naming Conventions:
Data Set Name Data Class Management Class
USERID.*.ACTIVE.** DCSEQ MCQUICK
USERID.*.CLIST.** DCREXX MCDFLT
USERID.*.FILE.** DCSEQ MCDFLT
USERID.*.LIB.** DCPDS MCDFLT
USERID.*.OUTLIST.** DCLIST MCQUICK
USERID.*.PANELS.** DCREXX MCDFLT
USERID.*.REXX.** DCREXX MCDFLT
USERID.*.SKELS.** DCREXX MCDFLT
USERID.*.TABLES.** DCREXX MCDFLT
USERID.*.TEMPLIB.** DCPDS MCQUICK


USERID is replaced with your TSO userid.

* and ** denotes a name that you supply for a qualifier in the data set name.

Data Class Definitions

DCLIST Creates a data set that can be used for output listings.

DCPDS Creates a partitioned data set

DCREXX Creates a partitioned data set for REXX procedures, panels, tables, etc..

DCSEQ Creates a sequential data set

Management Class Definitions

MCDFLT Manages the data set, by migrating the data set after 45 days of non-use, keeping the data set on migration for 24 months after the last referenced date. Up to 7 backups are kept for 24 months after the last referenced date, with 1 backup kept for an additional 12 months. The data set is deleted after 36 months of no use.

MCQUICK Manages the data set, by keeping the data set on disk for 7 days after the last reference date. Up to 7 backups are kept for 1 day beyond the last referenced date, with 1 additional backup kept for 1 additional day. The data set is deleted after 7 days of no use.

Sample data set names are shown below for each naming convention. The userid ABCDE is used for those requiring a userid.
Data Set Name Naming convention
SYS1.PROCLIB(FORV2CLG) Standard IBM
SYS2.WYL.PUB.LIB Standard IBM
ABCDE.CNTL(JCL) TSO
ABCDE.SURVEY.PIMA.Y90M03 TSO
ABCDE.RURAL.COUNTY TSO and ISPF
ABCDE.FINAL.FILE.FY98 TSO and ISPF and UND
ABCDE.SAMPLE.DATA(PROJ2) TSO and ISPF
ABCDE.SAS.LIB(PROJ2) TSO and ISPF and UND
WYL.USR.AB.CDE.LIB(LOGON) WYLBUR)
WYL.USR.AB.CDE.PROJ5.FORTRAN WYLBUR


In a batch environment (i.e., in JCL statements), data sets are referenced by fully qualified names; that is, the full name of the data set is used. If a single member of a partitioned data set is being referenced, the full name of the data set, appended with the member name enclosed in parentheses, must be used (e.g., SAXYZ.DATA.LIB(FALL981).

In the TSO and Wylbur environments, under some conditions, an abbreviated form of data set names is permitted. It is always permissible to use fully qualified data set names. The table below illustrates various possibilities for referencing data set names from the TSO, WYLBUR, and batch environments.
Fully qualified data set name Referenced from Referenced as
ABCDE.BOTANY.FILE batch JCL ABCDE.BOTANY.FILE
TSO 'ABCDE.BOTANY.FILE'
BOTANY.FILE
WYLBUR 'ABCDE.BOTANY.FILE'
"ABCDE.BOTANY.FILE"
$ABCDE.BOTANY.FILE
WYL.USR.AB.CDE.SURVEY.DATA batch JCL WYL.USR.AB.CDE.SURVEY.DATA
TSO 'WYL.USR.AB.CDE.SURVEY.DATA'
WYLBUR WYL.USR.AB.CDE.SURVEY.DATA
'WYL.USR.AB.CDE.SURVEY.DATA'
"WYL.USR.AB.CDE.SURVEY.DATA"
$WYL.USR.AB.CDE.SURVEY.DATA
SURVEY.DATA


Though not shown above, a member name may be specified for partitioned data sets. In the TSO environment the member name should appear inside the quotes for a quoted data set name: 'WYL.USR.AB.CDE.LIB(FALL981)'.

Note: In TSO, (for userid ABCDE) a reference to LIB is really a reference to 'ABCDE.*.LIB'. In WYLBUR, (for userid ABCDE) a reference to LIB is really a reference to 'WYL.USR.AB.CDE.LIB'. The data sets named 'ABCDE.*.LIB' and 'WYL.USR.AB.CDE.LIB' are two different, unrelated data sets except both are owned by ABCDE; these names are not two different names for the same data set.

Note: While it is permissible to continue to use the Wylbur name for your library, it will be more convenient to rename the PDS, following the ISPF and UND naming conventions discussed previously. As long as you use the Wylbur name, you will have to type the complete name (in quotes) every time you want to use that data set in ISPF.

Chapter 4

4. Editing Files

The editor provided with ISPF is commonly referred to as PDF (Program Development Facility). It is a full-screen editor and may be used to edit a member of a partitioned data set (pds) or a sequential data set. ("Library" is another common term which refers to a pds.)

The PDF editor provides full-screen editing and command editing. With full-screen editing, you can type new text or type over existing text anywhere on the screen. With command editing, you can enter commands on the command line or in the line command area (line number fields). Once you've finished editing, use the SAVE command to save the changes, use the END command (PF3) to save the changes and exit the editor, or use the CANCEL command (FP12) to exit without saving the changes.

Default editor settings (tab positions, recovery mode, number mode, etc.), which you can customize, are used automatically when you edit a data set. The PROFILE command is used to view the default settings. The settings for each file type are saved in the ISPPROF library and are automatically used when editing other files of the same type.

Before the editor can be used to enter data into a new data set, the data set must exist. ISPF option 3.2 may be used to create a new data set.

When editing a file, there are five possible situations:

Edit an existing sequential data set

Edit a new sequential data set; an empty sequential data set must be created prior to editing

Edit an existing member in an existing partitioned data set

Edit a new member in an existing partitioned data set

Edit a new member in a new partitioned data set; an empty partitioned data set must be created prior to editing

In only two situations is it necessary to create an new, empty data set prior to invoking the editor. Also, note the difference between editing a new member of an existing data set and editing a new member of a new data set; only the latter requires a new, empty data set to be created.

As a general rule, it is preferable and more convenient to create a new file as a member of a partitioned data set than to create it as a sequential data set. Sequential data sets utilize disk space inefficiently if small files are concerned, and sequential data sets take more effort to create. (For example, with a 10-track quota, hundreds of small files may be saved if partitioned data sets are used, but only a maximum of 10 small files may be saved if sequential data sets are used.)

4.1 Edit Panel

The PDF editor is invoked from the ISPF Primary Option Menu (option 2). The editor displays an entry panel which contains several input fields, including a field for the name of the data set to be edited. After you have typed the data set name and pressed ENTER, the editor will display the file if it contains data or will display an input screen if the file is empty. A sample Edit Entry Panel is shown below:





















The data set name may be entered in either of two locations: the ISPF LIBRARY fields (Project, Group, Type, and Member) or the DATA SET NAME field. If both the ISPF LIBRARY fields and the DATA SET NAME field contain data set names, the DATA SET NAME field is used. One useful feature of the ISPF LIBRARY fields is the data set name is retained from one terminal session to the next, but not for the DATA SET NAME field.

The DATA SET NAME field is below "OTHER ... DATA SET" in the middle of the screen. This field may be used for any sequential or partitioned data set (pds) name. If the data set is a pds, a parenthesized member name should be appended to the data set name. The data set name and any member name should be enclosed within single quote marks. If the first qualifier of the data set name matches your TSO userid, the first qualifier and the quote marks may be omitted. The member name is required for creating a new member and is optional for editing an existing member. If the member name is omitted for a pds, a menu of existing members is displayed; type an S next to the member to be edited.

Example: To edit a member in your "Wylbur library", type the data set name in the DATA SET NAME field as shown here:

Other Partitioned or Sequential Data Set:

Data Set Name . . .'wyl.usr.sa.xyz.lib(member)'

where "sa.xyz" is replaced with your logon and "member" is the name of a file in your library.

Either the ISPF LIBRARY fields or the DATA SET NAME field may be used if the fully qualified data set name contains exactly three qualifiers. Refer to the previous paragraph for instructions on how to use the DATA SET NAME field. For the ISPF LIBRARY fields, enter the first qualifier of the data set name (typically your userid) in the PROJECT field; enter the second qualifier in the first GROUP field; enter the last qualifier on the TYPE field. If the data set is a pds, enter a member name in the MEMBER field; the member name is optional for editing an existing member. If the member name is omitted for a pds, a menu of existing members is displayed; type an S next to the member to be edited.

The next example illustrates selecting a member from a menu of existing members:
EDIT --- SAXYZ.PRIVATE.LIB ----------------------- Row 00001 of 00004
Command ===> Scroll ===> PAGE
NAME VV.MM CREATED CHANGED SIZE INIT MOD ID
ARMSTRON 01.00 91/08/07 91/08/07 17:43 2 2 0 ABCDE
CHEESE 01.00 91/08/07 91/08/07 17:26 2 2 0 ABCDE
s CRATER 01.00 91/08/07 91/08/07 17:13 1 1 0 ABCDE
MOUNTAIN 01.00 91/08/07 91/08/07 17:14 1 1 0 ABCDE
**END**












4.2 Scrolling

PDF permits the file to be scrolled up, down, left, or right to edit portions of the file which extend beyond the screen boundary. The UP, DOWN, LEFT, and RIGHT commands have been assigned to several PF keys for your convenience.

The number of columns or lines by which the text will be scrolled is determined by the scroll amount in the Scroll field (typically on the right side, third line of the screen: Scroll ===>) or by the amount specified on the command line (typically on the left side, third line of the screen: Command ===>). Valid values which may be typed for the scroll amount are:

PAGE (P) advances one page (screen)

DATA (D) advances one page minus one line or column

HALF (H) advances one-half page

CSR (C) advances to the current cursor position (or one page if the cursor is outside the data area)

MAX (M) advances the maximum number of positions possible

a number advances the indicated number of positions

The function keys PF7 (UP) and PF8 (DOWN) may be used to scroll the text up or down. The function keys PF10 (LEFT) and PF11 (RIGHT) may be used to scroll the text left or right. The amount by which the text scrolls is determined by the scroll amount described previously.

4.3 Editing

When editing an existing file, you can scroll the text, enter editing commands, or type over the text displayed on the screen. When editing a new file, move the cursor to the blank portion of the screen to begin entering text. Use the TAB key to move from one line to the next for data entry. Press the ENTER key while the cursor is on a blank line to terminate text input mode. If you've entered data on the last line of the screen and then press the ENTER key, a new input line will appear.

Except for the initial input mode for a new file, editing a new file is no different than editing an existing file. You can press ENTER immediately upon entering input mode to terminate input mode without typing any data. This allows you to use other editing commands, such as COPY, to get data into the file.

Regardless of whether an existing file or a new file is being edited, any of the editor's commands may be used to edit the file. The commands are classified as being either primary commands, line commands, or edit macros. Primary commands are entered on the primary command line (Command ===>), and line commands are entered in the line command area (line number fields). Edit macros are typically entered on the command line, but it is possible for some macros to use the line command area, too. (Edit macros are REXX execs, CLISTs, or programs which behave as if they were primary commands or line commands. You can create your own edit macros; however, creation of edit macros is not discussed in this document. Refer to the ISPF/PDF reference manuals for information on how to create edit macros.)

Editing commands may act upon one or more lines and may be constrained to act within certain column boundaries. Editing actions are also dependent on current editor settings, maintained automatically in a data set profile. Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding default editor settings.

4.4 Edit Line Commands

Edit line commands are used to edit the displayed file. These editing commands are entered in the line command area (line number field), not on the primary command line (Command ===>). The line command area is the vertical area, containing line numbers, to the left of the text; the asterisks immediately above the first line number and below the last line number are also part of the line command area. A line command is entered by overtyping the line number (or asterisks) in the line command area. The command can act upon a single line or a block of lines.

The following sample screen illustrates use of the D line command to delete a line. All other line commands are used in a similar fashion.











Block commands operate on more than one line of data. To use block commands, you place the command (e.g., MM) in the line command areas of both the first and last lines of the block of data. The block can space several screens, so if the last line does not appear on your screen, place the block command on the first line, then press PF8 until the last line of data appears on your screen. You can then place the last block command on the last line of the block, at which time ISPF executes the command. A message indicating that a block function is pending appears in the Short Message area of your screen if the block is not closed with its matching end of block. You will also get this message if the block command requires a BEFORE or AFTER command (Move and Copy functions require this) and this command is missing.

4.4.1 Insert Lines

iN where N is an optional number indicating the number of lines to insert, immediately following this line. If N is omitted, N=1 is assumed.

4.4.2 Repeat Lines

rN where N is an optional number indicating the number of times to replicate (repeat) this line immediately following this line. If N is omitted, N=1 is assumed.

rrN indicates the first or last line of a block of lines to be repeated immediately following the block. N is an optional number indicating the number of times to replicate the block. When both ends of a block have been identified, press ENTER and the operation will be preformed.

4.4.3 Delete Lines

dN where N is an optional number indicating the number of lines to be deleted, starting with this line. If N is omitted, N=1 is assumed.

dd indicates the first or last line of a block of lines to be deleted. When both ends of a block have been identified, press ENTER and the operation will be performed.

4.4.4 Exclude Lines

xN where N is an optional number indicating the number of lines to be excluded. The line(s) is removed from the display but is not deleted from the file. Other editing commands (such as CHANGE, DELETE, and FIND) can selectively operate on lines which are not excluded or which are excluded.

xx indicates the first or last line of a block of lines to be excluded.

4.4.5 Copy Lines

cN where N is an optional number indicating the number of lines to copy to a new location. See 'Destinations' below.

cc indicates the first or last line of a block of lines to be copied. When both ends of a block have been identified, press ENTER and the operation will be performed.

4.4.6 Move Lines

mN where N is an optional number indicating the number of lines to move to a new location. See 'Destinations' below.

mm indicates the first or last line of a block of lines to be moved. When both ends of a block have been identified, press ENTER and the operation will be performed.

4.4.7 Destinations

aN indicates that the destination of a move or copy command is after this line. N indicates the number of times to repeat the group of lines being moved or copied.

bN indicates that the destination of a move or copy command is before this line. N indicates the number of times to repeat the group of lines being moved or copied.

4.4.8 Text Preparation

ts to split a line of text. After typing ts, move cursor to the desired point on the same line and press ENTER. A new line is inserted after the line with ts, text to the right of the cursor is moved to the next line following the inserted line and positioned at the left boundary column. Use tsN to insert N new lines between lines of text.

tf to reflow lines of text. Use text flow to join lines or restructure paragraphs following deletions, insertions, splittings, etc. When you enter tf in the line command area, your text is reflowed from the beginning of that line to the end of the paragraph. The end of a paragraph is denoted by a blank line, a change in indentation, or a period (.), colon (:), or ampersand (&) in column 1.

ucN to translate text to uppercase. If omitted, N is assumed to be 1.

ucc indicates the first and last line of a block of text to be translated to uppercase.

lcN to translate text to lowercase. If omitted, N is assumed to be1.

lcc indicates the first and last line of a block of text to be translated to lowercase.

cols to display a column position ruler. A =COLS> line is displayed after the line that you enter the cols command. Use the D command to remove the =COLS> line.

4.4.9 Line Labels

A period ( . ) immediately followed by a word with no intervening blanks, assigns a label to a line (e.g., .label). The label is assigned to the data line appearing to the right of the line number field.

The label is assigned for the duration of the edit session or until deleted. The label consists of the period (.) and 1 to 5 alphabetic characters. Once assigned, the label can be used in subsequent commands as if it were a line number. (When referencing a label in a command, the period must be included as part of the label.)

To assign a label, scroll the text so that the line to receive the label appears on the display, then enter the label (including the period) in the line command area of the appropriate line. To delete a label, type blanks over the label in the line command area (or use the RESET primary command). For example, the following illustrates how to assign the label ".BOX" to a line:









Generally, line numbers are not used in edit commands entered from the command line; instead, labels or line commands (A, B, M, etc.) are used to identify the target or line(s) to be acted upon. In practice, line commands are used more often than labels.

Do not assign any labels beginning with the letter "Z". There are several reserved labels, all beginning with Z, which are provided by the system. The reserved labels are provided for your convenience; you may use them in any editing command permitting use of labels. The following is a list of the reserved labels.

.ZFIRST The first data line in the file.

.ZF Same as .ZFIRST

.ZLAST The last data line in the file.

.ZL Same as .ZLAST

.ZCSR The data line on which the cursor is currently positioned.

Unlike other labels, these reserved labels do not stay with the same line. Labels .ZFIRST and .ZLAST always point to the current first and last lines in the file; .ZCSR always stays with the cursor.

4.5 Primary Commands

Primary commands are used to edit the displayed file. These editing commands are entered on the command line (COMMAND ===>), not in the line command area (line number fields). These commands may act upon one or more lines (or the entire data set) and may be constrained within boundary columns.

The following sample screen illustrates use of the SAVE primary command to save an updated file without exiting the editor. All other primary commands are used in a similar fashion.









The syntax for primary commands is described in this section. The following conventions are used for describing command syntax.

Uppercase Commands and operands in uppercase must be spelled as shown (in either uppercase or lowercase.

Lowercase Operands in lowercase are variable for which you substitute your own values.

Braces Required operands are enclose in braces "{ }"; do not type the braces when you enter the operand.

Brackets Optional operands are enclosed in brackets "[ ]"; do not type the brackets when you enter the operand.

Columns Multiple operands from which you can choose only one are shown stacked in columns.

Bar (|) Multiple operands from which you can choose only one are shown separated by a vertical bar "|"; do not type the bar when you enter the operand.

Underline Default values are underlined.

A table summarizing the edit primary commands is given in Appendix C.

4.5.1 AUTONUM - Automatic Renumber

The AUTONUM command determines whether the data is automatically renumbered when it is saved. For automatic renumbering to occur, number mode must be on. The AUTONUM setting is saved in the data set profile. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

AUTONUM [ON ]
[OFF]

4.5.2 AUTOSAVE - Automatic Save

The AUTOSAVE command determines whether changed data is automatically saved when the editor is exited via the END command. The END command is automatically generated if you use a PF key assigned to the END command (usually PF3) or the RETURN command (usually PF4), or if you exit the editor with the ISPF =X command.

AUTOSAVE [ON ]
[OFF PROMPT ]
[OFF NOPROMPT]

If the ON option is in effect, changed data is automatically saved upon exit. If the PROMPT option is in effect and if changes have been made but not yet saved, the editor will prompt you to enter the SAVE command or the CANCEL command before exiting. If NOPROMPT is in effect, the editor will exit without saving changed data just as if the CANCEL command had been used. (ON is the default. NOPROMPT is not recommended.) The AUTOSAVE setting is saved in the data set profile. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)



4.5.3 BOUNDS - Set Column Boundaries

The BOUNDS command sets the left and right column boundaries for editing commands. (The BNDS line command performs the same function and is easier to use.) The column numbers used in the BOUNDS command are data columns, not physical columns. For example, when a variable format file is displayed with number mode on, data column 1 is physical column 9. It is recommended that number mode be set off. The BOUNDS setting is saved in the data set profile. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

BOUNDS [left-bound right-bound]
BNDS

In general, editing actions operate only on text within the column boundaries. The following table shows the commands which work within the current boundary settings. (The table shows macro commands as well as line and primary commands. Macro commands are used only within edit macros and are not entered on the edit command line. Refer to the ISPF/PDF reference manuals for further information regarding macros and macro commands.)
Line
Commands
Primary
Commands
Macro
Commands





TE
TF
TS
CHANGE 
EXCLUDE
FIND   
LEFT   
RCHANGE
RFIND  
RIGHT  
SORT   
CHANGE SHIFT <
EXCLUDE SHIFT >
FIND SHIFT (
LEFT SHIFT )
RCHANGE SEEK   
RFIND TENTER 
RIGHT TSPLIT 
SORT TSPLIT 
USER_STATE


4.5.4 CANCEL - Exit Without Saving Changes

The CANCEL command exits the editor without saving changed data. Any changes made prior to a SAVE command are not effected; only those changes made since the last SAVE command are cancelled. Use the UNDO command to undo changes made prior to the previous SAVE.

CANCEL
CAN

4.5.5 CAPS - Set Upper-Lower Case

The CAPS command controls whether alphabetic data entered from the terminal is automatically converted to uppercase; existing text is not affected. (Use the LC or UC line commands for changing the case of existing text.) When an existing file containing all uppercase letters is edited, the editor automatically sets CAPS ON. If the existing file contains any lowercase letters, CAPS OFF is set.

CAPS [ON ]
[OFF]

For an existing file, the editor inspects the file as it is read in and sets caps mode to match the existing data. For a new file, the caps mode is dependent on the data set profile. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

4.5.6 CHANGE - Change Text

The CHANGE command searches for one or more occurrences of a string and changes the string to another value. The file is scrolled so that the first line found appears on the screen. If any excluded lines are found, they become non-excluded, i.e., they are displayed.

Use of CHANGE in combination with EXCLUDE and FIND is useful for displaying and editing selective lines. Both CHANGE and FIND have operands (X and NX, for excluded and non-excluded) which limit editing action to lines in either category or both. The RCHANGE command, which is typically assigned to function key PF6, is particularly useful for repeating the previous CHANGE command.

CHANGE string1 string2 [range] [NEXT ] [CHARS ] [X ] [col1 [col2]]
CHA [ALL ] [PREFIX] [NX]
[FIRST] [SUFFIX]
[LAST ] [WORD ]
[PREV ]

The command searches for string1 according to the specified criteria and changes each occurrence of string1 to string2. All lines found matching the search criteria become non-excluded. For either string, it is not necessary to enclose the string in quotes, provided the string consists of one word containing no special characters and uppercase/lowercase is not significant. If the string contains more than one word or special characters, it must be enclosed in quotes. If uppercase/lowercase is significant, the string must be enclosed in quotes and prefixed with C, for example, c'Brown Fox'. String1 and string2 are permitted to have different lengths. String1 must be non-null. To represent string2 as a null string, use two consecutive quotes.

Specify a range to limit the search to certain lines. The range consists of two labels; the default value is .ZF .ZL (the entire file).

FIRST, LAST, NEXT, and PREV are used to search for at most one line. The operand FIRST searches forward from the top of the file; LAST searches backward from the bottom of the file. NEXT searches forward from the current cursor position; PREV searches backward from the current cursor position. ALL searches for all lines which meet the search criteria. If ALL is used, changed lines are flagged with ==CHG> in the line command area; lines which could not be changed because of error conditions are flagged with ==ERR> in the line command area.

CHARS searches for the string anywhere the characters match. PREFIX searches for the string at the beginning of a word; SUFFIX searches for the string at the end of a word. WORD searches for a string which is delimited on both sides by blanks or other non-alphanumeric characters.

X limits the search to currently excluded lines; any lines found become non-excluded and are displayed. NX limits the search to non-excluded lines. The default is to search all lines.

Col1 and col2 represent column numbers. If col1 is present and col2 is not, the found string must begin in col1. If both col1 and col2 are present, the search is done between the two columns. If col1 and col2 are absent, the search is done between the current boundary columns.

A sample use of CHANGE is shown below. The example shows how to change the string 'brown fox' to c'Brown Fox' in all non-excluded lines.

CHA 'brown fox' c'Brown Fox' ALL NX

4.5.7 COPY - Copy from an External File

The COPY command copies an external file into the file being edited. The external file is not changed.

COPY [member] [AFTER label ]
[BEFORE label]

If the file to be copied resides in the same partitioned data set as the file being edited, include the member name on the command line. If the member name is omitted, the editor displays a screen upon which you type the partitioned data set name and member name or the sequential data set name to be used.

The editor needs a target for the copied file. In practice, it's usually easiest to use the A or B line commands (instead of the AFTER or BEFORE parameters) to identify where the copied file should be inserted. Use of AFTER or BEFORE requires a label be assigned to the target line.

4.5.8 CREATE - Create an External File

The CREATE command creates a new file using data from the file currently being edited. The command can only create a new member in the same or a different partitioned data set. It cannot replace a member nor create or replace a sequential data set.

CREATE [member] [range]
CRE

If the new file is to be a member of the partitioned data set currently being edited, include the member name on the command line. If the member name is omitted, the editor displays a screen upon which you type the partitioned data set name and member name to be used.

The range identifies the lines to be copied into the new member. If the range is omitted (which is typical), the C (copy) or M (move) line commands are used to identify the lines. (Moved lines are deleted from the file being edited.) If the range is present, it consists of two labels which identify the lines to be copied into the new member. (The predefined labels .ZFIRST and .ZLAST may be used to copy the entire file.)

4.5.9 DELETE - Delete Lines

The DELETE command deletes lines from the data being edited. (The D line command may be used instead of DELETE.)

DELETE {ALL X | NX}
DEL {range X | NX}
{ALL range }

ALL refers to the entire file. Range refers to a subset of the file, and consists of two line labels identifying the first and last lines. X and NX represent excluded or non-excluded lines respectively. Several examples are shown below.

DELETE ALL X Delete all excluded lines in the file.

DELETE ALL NX Delete all non-excluded lines in the file.

DELETE .lab1 .lab2 X Delete all excluded lines between the two labels.

DELETE ALL .lab3 lab4 Delete all lines between the two labels.

DELETE ALL .ZF .ZL Delete all lines in the file. .ZF and .ZL are two system defined labels representing the first and last lines in the file.

The syntax of the last two examples are actually equivalent. The only difference was in actual labels used. As protection against errors, deletion of all lines in a file requires use of a range; hence, DELETE ALL requires an additional parameter to identify the lines.

Both examples shown below will delete all lines containing the phrase "Brown Fox".

RESET X X ALL

X C'Brown Fox' ALL F C'Brown Fox' ALL

DEL ALL X DEL ALL NX

RESET X

4.5.10 DOWN - Scroll Down

The DOWN command scrolls the text down. (This command is also assigned to function key PF8.) An optional parameter determines the scroll amount. If the parameter is omitted, the scroll amount in the upper right portion of the screen is used.

DOWN [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]

The command BOTTOM is equivalent to DOWN MAX.

4.5.11 END - Exit Editor

The END command terminates the editing session and exits the editor. By default, the PF3 (END) and PF4 (RETURN) keys generate an END command. Whether or not the data is automatically saved when exiting is dependent on the AUTOSAVE setting. (Refer to the AUTOSAVE command for more information.)

END

4.5.12 EXCLUDE - Hide Lines

The EXCLUDE command searches for lines containing a specified string and then removes those lines from the display, replacing them with a dashed line. The lines are not deleted, only hidden. To display the lines, use the RESET command.

The EXCLUDE command is useful for classifying lines into two categories: excluded and non-excluded. Other editing commands (such as CHANGE, DELETE, FIND, and SORT) have operands (X and NX, for excluded and non-excluded) which limit the editing action to lines in either category or both. Additionally, when the FIND command searches for excluded lines, the found lines become non-excluded.

EXCLUDE string [range] [NEXT ] [CHARS ] [col1 [col2]]
EXC [ALL ] [PREFIX]
EX [FIRST] [SUFFIX]
X [LAST ] [WORD ]
[PREV ]

The command searches for lines containing the string according to the specified criteria. Found lines are excluded from the display. The string is not enclosed in quotes, provided the string consists of only one word containing no special characters and uppercase/lowercase is not significant. If the string contains more than one word or contains special characters, it must be enclosed in quotes. If uppercase/lowercase is significant, the string must be enclosed in quotes and prefixed with C, for example, c'Brown Fox'.

Specify a range to limit the search to certain lines. The range consists of two labels; the default value is .ZF .ZL (the entire file).

FIRST, LAST, NEXT, and PREV are used to search for and exclude at most one line. The operand FIRST searches forward from the top of the file; LAST searches backward from the bottom of the file. NEXT searches forward from the current cursor position; PREV searches backward from the current cursor position. ALL searches for and excludes all lines which meet the search criteria. (EXCLUDE ALL is often used to exclude all lines in the file; then the FIND command is used to display selected lines.)

CHARS searches for the string anywhere the characters match. PREFIX searches for the string at the beginning of a word; SUFFIX searches for the string at the end of a word. WORD searches for a string which is delimited on both sides by blanks or other non-alphanumeric characters.

Col1 and col2 represent column numbers. If col1 is present and col2 is not, the found string must begin in col1. If both col1 and col2 are present, the search is done between the two columns. If col1 and col2 are absent, the search is done between the current boundary columns.

A sample use of EXCLUDE is as follows. Suppose several lines contain the string 'brown fox' and some of those lines need to be changed. To make the editing task easier (by displaying only those lines needing edits), you can exclude all lines from the display, display (find) the lines containing the search string, do the editing changes, then display all lines.

X ALL
F 'brown fox' ALL
...do the editing changes...
RESET X

6.5.13 FIND - Search for Text

The FIND command searches for one or more occurrences of a string. The file is scrolled so that the first line found appears on the screen. If any excluded lines are found, they become non-excluded, i.e., they are displayed.

Use of FIND in combination with EXCLUDE and CHANGE is useful for displaying and editing selective lines. Both FIND and CHANGE have operands (X and NX, for excluded and non-excluded) which limit editing action to lines in either category or both. The RFIND command, which is typically assigned to function key PF5, is particularly useful for repeating the previous FIND command.

FIND string [range] [NEXT ] [CHARS ] [X ] [col1 [col2]]
F [ALL ] [PREFIX] [NX]
[FIRST] [SUFFIX]
[LAST ] [WORD ]
[PREV ]

The command searches for lines containing the string according to the specified criteria. All of the found lines become non-excluded. The string is not enclosed in quotes, provided the string consists of only one word containing no special characters and uppercase/lowercase is not significant. If the string contains more than one word or contains special characters, it must be enclosed in quotes. If uppercase/lowercase is significant, the string must be enclosed in quotes and prefixed with C, for example, c'Brown Fox'.

Specify a range to limit the search to certain lines. The range consists of two labels; the default value is .ZF .ZL (the entire file).

FIRST, LAST, NEXT, and PREV are used to search for at most one line. The operand FIRST searches forward from the top of the file; LAST searches backward from the bottom of the file. NEXT searches forward from the current cursor position; PREV searches backward from the current cursor position. ALL searches for all lines which meet the search criteria. (EXCLUDE ALL is often used to exclude all lines in the file; then the FIND command is used to display selected lines.)

CHARS searches for the string anywhere the characters match. PREFIX searches for the string at the beginning of a word; SUFFIX searches for the string at the end of a word. WORD searches for a string which is delimited on both sides by blanks or other non-alphanumeric characters.

X limits the search to currently excluded lines; any lines found become non-excluded and are displayed. NX limits the search to non-excluded lines. The default is to search all lines.

Col1 and col2 represent column numbers. If col1 is present and col2 is not, the found string must begin in col1. If both col1 and col2 are present, the search is done between the two columns. If col1 and col2 are absent, the search is done between the current boundary columns.

A sample use of FIND is shown below. The example shows how to find lines containing the string 'brown fox' but not 'green frog'.

X ALL
F 'brown fox' ALL
X 'green frog' ALL

4.5.14 HELP - Display Help Information

The HELP command requests online help for editing. While a edit panel is displayed, enter the HELP command or press the PF1 key to display the help information.

HELP

4.5.15 HEX - Display Data in Hexadecimal

The HEX command displays the file in hexadecimal format. (Each character or byte consists of two hex digits.) Normally, the file is displayed in character format. You can edit data on the screen, character or hexadecimal, by typing over the data.

HEX [ON VERT]
[ON DATA]
[OFF]

HEX ON VERT displays a vertical hexadecimal representation. HEX ON DATA displays a horizontal hexadecimal representation. HEX OFF restores the display to character format. The HEX setting is saved in the data set profile. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

4.5.16 LEFT - Scroll Left

The LEFT command scrolls the text left. (This command is also assigned to function key PF10.) An optional parameter determines the scroll amount. If the parameter is omitted, the scroll amount in the upper right portion of the screen is used.

LEFT [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]

4.5.17 LOCATE - Scroll to a Specific Line

The LOCATE command scrolls the file to display the indicated line at the top of the data window. A label or line number is used to identify the line.

LOCATE {line-number}
LOC {label}
L

For example, if number mode is off and relative line number 229 has the label ".BOX" assigned to it, the following commands are equivalent:

L .BOX
L 229

The generic form of the LOCATE command scrolls the file to a particular kind of line rather than a specific line. Use a range, consisting of two line labels, to limit the search to specific lines; the default range is .ZF .ZL (the entire file).

LOCATE [NEXT ] {CHANGE | CHA} [range]
LOC [FIRST] {COMMAND | COM}
L [LAST ] {ERROR | ERR}
[PREV ] {EXCLUDED | X }
{LABEL | LAB}
{SPECIAL | SPE}

FIRST begins the search from the top of the file proceeding forward; LAST begins the search from the bottom proceeding backwards. NEXT begins the search from the current screen proceeding forward; PREV begins the search from the current screen proceeding backward. The different kinds of lines are described below.

CHANGE A line with the ==CHG> flag. When a command changes multiple lines, a flag is placed in the line command area of the changed lines.

COMMAND A line with a pending line command in the line command area.

ERROR A line with the ==ERR> flag. When a command changes multiple lines, a flag is placed in the line command area of lines which should have been changed but were not changed because of error conditions.

EXCLUDED A line which is excluded.

LABEL A line for which a label is defined.

SPECIAL A line with any of the following flags in the line command area:

Bounds lines flagged as =BNDS>

Column lines flagged as =COLS>

Information lines flagged as ======

Mask lines flagged as =MASK>

Message lines flagged as ==MSG>

Note lines flagged as =NOTE=

Profile lines flagged as =PROF>

Tabs lines flagged as =TABS>

Note: Line numbers may have up to 8 digits; leading zeros are not necessary. If the line number contains 6 or fewer digits, it refers to the number in the line command area displayed to the left of each line. If the line number contains more than 6 digits, it refers to the sequence numbers in the data records, including the modification flag if NUMBER ON STD is in effect. For NUMBER OFF, it refers to the relative line position (first = 1, second = 2, etc.). For NUMBER ON COBOL, it refers to the number in the line command field, which is the data sequence number.

4.5.18 MOVE - Move Lines

The MOVE command moves (copies and deletes) an external file into the file being edited. The external file ceases to exist after the move is complete. When moving a member of a partitioned data set, only the member is deleted.

MOVE [member] [AFTER label ]
[BEFORE label]

If the file to be moved resides in the same partitioned data set as the file being edited, include the member name on the command line. If the member name is omitted, the editor displays a screen upon which you type the partitioned data set name and member name or the sequential data set name to be used.

The editor needs a target for the moved file. In practice, it's usually easiest to use the A or B line commands (instead of the AFTER or BEFORE parameters) to identify where the moved file should be inserted. Use of AFTER or BEFORE requires a label be assigned to the target line.

4.5.19 NONUMBER - Set Line Numbers Off

The NONUMBER command turns off number mode, which controls numbering of lines. It has no operands and is equivalent to the NUMBER OFF command. The number mode setting is saved in the data set profile. Refer to the NUMBER command for more information.

NONUMBER
NONUM

4.5.20 NULLS - Control Trailing Blanks

The NULLS command determines whether trailing blanks in each data fields are written to the screen as blanks or nulls. Both blanks and nulls are invisible when displayed on the screen. ON STD or ON ALL simplifies use of the insert key for inserting text in existing lines; otherwise, trailing blanks at the end of the line would need erasing before text could be inserted. OFF is useful for entering text on the screen after the last non-blank character in a line, else extra spaces will have to be entered. The nulls setting is saved in the data set profile. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

NULLS [ON STD]
[ON ALL]
[OFF]

4.5.21 NUMBER - Control Line Numbers

The NUMBER command sets number mode, which controls line numbering. It is recommended that numbering be off. With number mode off, line numbers appear on the screen but are not placed in the file. With number mode on, line numbers appear on the screen and are inserted in the file. Possible loss of data can occur if the line number fields in the file are non-blank when numbering mode is turned on.

NUMBER [ON ] [STD ] [DISPLAY]
NUM [OFF] [COBOL ]
[STD COBOL]

Line numbers are inserted in the file when number mode is turned on. The line numbers are placed in the standard sequence field, the COBOL field, or both. The standard sequence field is the last 8 columns of fixed length records or the first 8 columns of variable format records. The COBOL field is the first 6 columns, but only for fixed length records. The parameter ON STD requests line numbering in the standard sequence field; ON COBOL, the COBOL field; ON STD COBOL, both fields; OFF, no line number fields. (The OFF parameter turns off number mode, but does not remove existing line numbers from the file. Use the UNNUMBER command to turn off number mode and remove line numbers from the file.)

The editor automatically scrolls the data left or right so that the columns containing line numbers do not appear on the screen. Use the DISPLAY operand if you want the line number field to be included in the display window.

For an existing file, the editor inspects the file as it is read in and sets number mode to match the existing data. For a new file, the number mode is dependent on the profile for the data set. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

4.5.22 PROFILE - Control Default Settings

The PROFILE command displays the current edit profile, defines a new edit profile, or switches to a different edit profile. An edit profile is a collection of default editor settings for a particular data set type. The profile contains the following information:

Profile name Tabs mode Autosave setting

Recovery mode Tab columns Autolist setting

Number mode Mask line Pack setting

Autonumber setting Bounds settings Note setting

Caps mode Stats mode Initial macro

Nulls mode Hex mode Profile lock

An edit profile is maintained for each data set type. The last qualifier of the data set name determines data set type, i.e., the profile name. For example, if the data set "ABCDE.TSO.LIB" is edited, LIB is the data set type and the LIB edit profile is used by default.

The PROFILE command has two formats, both of which are shown below. The first format is used to display, define, or switch edit profiles. The second format is used to lock or unlock the current profile.

PROFILE [name] [number]

PROFILE {LOCK | UNLOCK}

Entering PROFILE without a name displays the current profile. Entering the command with a name switches to the named profile and then displays the profile. By default, the most common profile settings are displayed. To view a larger or smaller subset of the profile, specify a number from 0 to 9 on the command line; use 9 to view the complete profile; use 0 to switch the profile without displaying it. The following example illustrates what might be displayed if the command PROFILE FORT 9 is entered on the command line:

















Until you have become familiar with using the editor, it is recommended you type the PROFILE or PROFILE 9 command each time you use the editor. Review the settings to determine whether any settings need changing. To change any particular setting, enter the appropriate command on the command line. If PROFILE UNLOCK is in effect, any changed settings are saved in the profile for future editing sessions. If PROFILE LOCK is in effect, any changed settings are used for the current editing session only.

The name of the current profile is displayed as the first word on the first profile line. The first word of the other phrases (RECOVERY, NUMBER, CAPS, HEX, etc.) are the names of the corresponding editor commands which should be used to change the settings. (Refer to the descriptions of the editor commands for information regarding the various settings.) To remove the profile lines from the display, use the RESET PROFILE command.

Suggested settings include RECOVERY ON, NUMBER OFF, and AUTOSAVE ON. The other settings should be changed according to your particular needs.

When editing an existing file, the caps, number, stats, and pack settings are set automatically to match the data. To force caps, number, stats, or pack to a particular setting use an initial macro or enter the appropriate commands on the command line.

CAUTION: Before setting number mode on, be sure the sequence number fields are blank. Line numbers will overlay any data in the sequence number fields. If you accidently overlay data by setting number mode on, use the CANCEL command. If no data has been overlaid and you only need to unnumber the file, use the UNNUMBER command. Refer to the description of the NUMBER command for information regarding line numbers and sequence number fields.

4.5.23 RCHANGE - Repeat CHANGE Command

The RCHANGE command, rarely entered on the command line, repeats the change requested by the most recent CHANGE command. The changing continues from current cursor position. Consequently, RCHANGE is most useful when entered via a function key. Function key PF6 is defined as RCHANGE by default. To repeat a change, press the PF6 key.

RCHANGE

4.5.24 RECOVERY - Control Edit Recovery

The RECOVERY command sets edit recovery mode, which determines whether you will be able to use the UNDO command. When recovery mode is on, the editor creates and maintains a recovery data set. If you do not need the UNDO command or do not want the overhead of recovery mode, use the OFF parameter to disable recovery mode. By default, when recovery mode is off, the editor will display a warning message when you edit a file. To disable the warning message, include the NOWARN parameter. The recovery mode setting is saved in the data set profile. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

RECOVERY [ON ]
REC [OFF WARN ]
[OFF NOWARN]

4.5.25 RENUM - Renumber Lines

The RENUM command turns number mode on and renumbers all lines from 100 by 100. It is recommended that numbering be off. With number mode off, line numbers appear on the screen but are not placed in the file. With number mode on, line numbers appear on the screen and are inserted in the file. Possible loss of data can occur if the line number fields in the file are non-blank when numbering mode is turned on.

RENUMBER [ON ] [STD ] [DISPLAY]
RENUM [OFF] [COBOL ]
[STD COBOL]

Line numbers are inserted in the file when number mode is turned on. The line numbers are placed in the standard sequence field, the COBOL field, or both. The standard sequence field is the last 8 columns of fixed length records or the first 8 columns of variable format records. The COBOL field is the first 6 columns, but only for fixed length records. The parameter ON STD requests line numbering in the standard sequence field; ON COBOL, the COBOL field; ON STD COBOL, both fields; OFF, no line number fields. (The OFF parameter turns off number mode, but does not remove existing line numbers from the file. Use the UNNUMBER command to turn off number mode and remove line numbers from the file.)

The editor automatically scrolls the data left or right so that the columns containing line numbers do not appear on the screen. Use the DISPLAY operand if you want the line number field to be included in the display window.

For an existing file, the editor inspects the file as it is read in and sets number mode to match the existing data. For a new file, the number mode is dependent on the profile for the data set. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

4.5.26 REPLACE - Replace External File

The REPLACE command replaces an existing file or creates a new file using data from the file currently being edited. The command replaces or creates a member in the same or a different partitioned data set. It can also replace the contents of an existing sequential data set.

REPLACE [member] [range]
REP

If the replaced file is a member of the partitioned data set currently being edited, include the member name on the command line. If the member name is omitted, the editor displays a screen upon which you type the partitioned data set name and member name or the sequential data set name to be used.

The range identifies the lines to be copied into the new member. If the range is omitted (which is typical), the C (copy) or M (move) line commands are used to identify the lines. (The CC or MM line commands are also valid. Moved lines are deleted from the file being edited.) If the range is present, it consists of two labels which identify the lines to be be copied into the new member. (The predefined labels .ZFIRST and .ZLAST may be used to copy the entire file.)

4.5.27 RESET - Reset Data Display

The RESET command removes labels, pending line commands, error flags, and change flags. It can also remove special lines from the display and can display excluded lines. Use a range, consisting of two line labels, to limit the command to specific lines; the default range is .ZF .ZL (the entire file).

RESET [CHANGE | CHA] [range]
RES [COMMAND | COM]
[ERROR | ERR]
[EXCLUDED | X ]
[LABEL | LAB]
[SPECIAL | SPE]

If you do not specify any operands, RESET processes all operands except LABEL.

CHANGE Removes ==CHG> flags. When a command changes multiple lines, a flag is placed in the line command area of the changed lines.

COMMAND Removes pending line commands in the line command area.

ERROR Removes ==ERR> flags. When a command changes multiple lines, a flag is placed in the line command area of lines which should have been changed but were not changed because of error conditions.

EXCLUDED Redisplays excluded lines.

LABEL Removes labels.

SPECIAL Removes the following temporary lines:

Bounds lines flagged as =BNDS>

Column lines flagged as =COLS>

Information lines flagged as ======

Mask lines flagged as =MASK>

Message lines flagged as ==MSG>

Note lines flagged as =NOTE=

Profile lines flagged as =PROF>

Tabs lines flagged as =TABS>

4.5.28 RFIND - Repeat FIND Command

The RFIND command, rarely entered on the command line, searches for the string defined by the most recent FIND, CHANGE, or EXCLUDE command. If the string was defined by an EXCLUDE command, the line containing the string will be excluded. The searching continues from current cursor position. Consequently, RFIND is most useful when entered via a function key. Function key PF5 is defined as RFIND by default. To repeat a search, press the PF5 key.

RFIND

4.5.29 RIGHT - Scroll Right

The RIGHT command scrolls the text right. (This command is also assigned to function key PF11.) An optional parameter determines the scroll amount. If the parameter is omitted, the scroll amount in the upper right portion of the screen is used.

RIGHT [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]

4.5.30 SAVE - Save Data in External File

The SAVE command saves edited data without exiting the editor. If AUTOSAVE is on, an automatic save occurs when exiting the editor; otherwise, either SAVE or CANCEL is required to exit. There are no parameters for this command.

SAVE

4.5.31 SORT - Sort Lines

The SORT command sorts the data in the order specified. By default, the entire file is sorted in ascending sequence. Only data within the current bounds is sorted; data outside the bounds remains unchanged. (Labels, excluded lines, line numbers, and other flagged lines refer to relative line in the file, not the actual data. When data is sorted, these attributes remain on the same relative line.)

SORT [range] [X ] [sortfields]
[NX]

To limit the sort to specific lines, include a range on the command line. The range consists of the beginning and ending labels of the lines to be sorted. The sort can be further limited to excluded lines only (X) or non-excluded lines only (NX).

Up to 5 sort fields can be specified. Each sort field has the following syntax.

[A] [start-column [end-column]]
[D]

Ascending sequence, the default, is represented by A; descending sequence is represented by D. If a sequence is explicitly requested for one field, a sequence must be specified for each field. If more than one field is specified, the starting and ending column numbers for each field is required. If only one field is specified, the default starting column is the left boundary and the default ending column is the right boundary.

4.5.32 STATS - Control Library Statistics

The STATS command determines whether statistics are maintained for a member of a partitioned data set. The statistics include date created, date of last update, and number of records in the member. Statistics are not maintained for sequential data sets.

STATS [ON ]
[OFF]

For an existing file, the editor inspects the file as it is read and sets stats mode to match the existing file. For a new file, stats mode is dependent on the profile for the data set. (Refer to the PROFILE command for information regarding profiles.)

4.5.33 SUBMIT - Submit Batch Job

The SUBMIT command submits the file currently being edited to be processed as a batch job. Fully specified JCL is required. The range is optional; if included, it consists of two labels identifying the first and last lines to be submitted.

SUBMIT [range]
SUB

The editor SUBMIT command is more flexible than the TSO SUBMIT command regarding data set format and record length. The editor command allows any valid format (FB, VB, etc.) and record length (LRECL); the TSO command is limited to fixed format only (FB) and record length 80. Regardless of the method used to submit a batch job, only the first 80 columns of each record are submitted.

4.5.34 UNDO - Undo Previous Edit

The UNDO command reverses editing changes made during the current editing session. Edit transactions are reversed in the order made, one at a time, each time UNDO is entered. (Because editing changes do not take effect until ENTER is pressed, an edit transaction is defined as all editing changes which occur when ENTER is pressed.) RECOVERY ON must be in effect for UNDO to be useful. Refer to the RECOVERY command for more information.

UNDO

4.5.35 UNNUMBER - Remove Line Numbers

The UNNUMBER command turns off number mode, which controls numbering of lines. It also sets all line number fields to blanks and positions the data so that column 1 is the first column displayed. It has no operands and is valid only when number mode is currently on. Refer to the NUMBER command for information regarding line numbering.

UNNUMBER
UNNUM

4.5.36 UP - Scroll Up

The UP command scrolls the text up. (This command is also assigned to function keys PF7.) An optional parameter determines the scroll amount. If the parameter is omitted, the scroll amount in the upper right portion of the screen is used.

UP [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]

The command TOP is equivalent to UP MAX.

Chapter 5

5. Utilities

ISPF provides a number of utilities to work with data sets and members. You can access the menu in several ways:

Choose option 3 from the ISPF Primary Option Menu, or

Choose the Utilities function from an Action Bar menu.

1 Use Library to perform functions on any partitioned data set, such as compress (condense) a library; display data set information; work with a member of the library. Enter the data set name in either the ISPF Library fields or in the Data Set Name field. You can either enter an option or leave the option blank and press ENTER. If you do not specify an option, ISPF will display a member list. To work with a member in the list, TAB to the space in front of a member, then type the appropriate command for the function you wish to perform:

E (edit) Alter a member and save changes

V (view) Alter a member, but changes are not saved when you End (PF3). This option is useful when you want to submit a batch job with some changes to the statements, but don't want the changes saved permanently

B (browse) View a member without the possibility of making any changes. See Appendix A for a summary of the Browse commands

D (delete) Delete a member

R (delete) Assign a different name to a member. Type r in front of file, press TAB key, type a new name for the member, and press ENTER. You will need to exit the member list and display a new member list to see the renamed file or work with the file

P (print) Print a member. The file is printed to the List data set

2 Use Data Set to allocate a new data set, rename a data set, and delete a data set. Before you can enter information into a data set, you must first allocate the data set. There are two options you can use to allocate a data set:

A (Allocate new data set) provides more flexibility, but you need to supply all the details (lrecl, blksize, recfm, space). Most users don't know what to use for these parameters.

M (Enhanced data set allocation) is the recommended method to allocate new data sets. If you follow the UND naming conventions (discussed in chapter 3), all you need to specify is a data set name and this option will supply the correct parameters for you.

To rename a data set, enter a data set name in the ISPF Library fields or the Data Set Name field. After you press ENTER, a new panel will appear; enter a new name for the data set.

To delete a data set, enter a data set name in the ISPF Library fields or the Data Set Name field. A confirmation panel will appear, allowing you to verify you want to delete the file.

3 Use Move/Copy to move or copy a data set or a member. Use Copy to store a duplicate of the data set or a member. The original data set will still exist after the copy function is completed. Move will make a copy of the original file and delete the file in the original location after the move function is completed.

To copy or move a data set or a member to a new data set, you must first allocate the new data set.

To copy or move a data set or member to a new member of an existing partitioned data set, you do not need to allocate the member.

To move or copy, enter the appropriate selection in the Option field, then enter the data set information for the FROM data set in the appropriate fields and press ENTER. On the second panel you will enter the data set information for the TO (new) data set.

4 Use Dslist to print or display a list of data set names, including information about the data sets (i.e., space used, type of data set, date created). Enter all or part of a data set name in the "Dsname Level" field. Do not enclose Dsname Level in quotes. Wildcards can be used to select a specific list.

Examples of Dsname Level values:

SAXYZ list all files with the first qualifier same as TSO logon

SAXYZ.*.LIB list all LIB data sets for userid SAXYZ

ISPF displays the list of data sets that match your name criteria. Use PF11 (Right) and PF10 (Left) to see all the information about your data sets. You can also execute commands (such as edit, view, browse, delete, rename) from the data set list panel. Move the cursor to the prefix area to the left of the list and press PF1 (Help) to see complete list of commands.

6 Use Hardcopy to produce a printout of a data set or member of a pds. The printer can be a laser printer with an IP address or a system line printer. Specify the desired print option (PK or PD) and a Data Set Name. To print a member of a pds, include the member name (in quotes).

Examples of Data Set Name values:

'SAXYZ.SURVEY.FILE'

SURVEY.FILE

'WYL.USR.SA.XYZ.LIB(SURVEY)'

To print to a laser printer, specify "Print Mode" as LOCAL and enter a valid "Local Printer ID" (e.g., R549).

To print to a system line printer, specify "Print Mode" as BATCH, enter a valid "Sysout class" (e.g., A, Q) and press PF3 (End). This command will submit a batch job. You will be prompted to specify an identifier for the job; type a letter or number which is added to your userid to make a Jobname. If you specify Sysout class Q, go to IOF to print the output.



Chapter 6

6. Working with Batch Job Output

6.1 IOF

The facility which provides monitoring and control of MVS batch jobs is called IOF (Interactive Output Facility). IOF provides facilities for monitoring the progress of batch jobs queued for execution, jobs currently executing, and jobs completed. IOF can also be used to cancel active jobs and to review, print, purge, or redirect output from jobs that have completed. IOF performs the same functions as the Wylbur commands CANCEL, FETCH, LOCATE, PRINT, ROUTE, and PURGE.

6.2 Invoking IOF

To start IOF, choose option I from the North Dakota University System Main Menu. At the IOF Option Menu, press ENTER to use the default option which gives the status of all your jobs. A screen similar to the one shown below will appear. Press ENTER to refresh this screen and view an update on the status of your jobs. Each job is assigned a number in the IOF Job List. This line number is entered in the COMMAND ===> prompt to select the job to work with.























6.3 Input Jobs

Input jobs are those jobs awaiting execution. Use the prefix command B to browse (view) the job or C to cancel it. The command is typed in the leftmost position of the IOF line corresponding to the job to be acted upon. Refer to the IOF online Help and tutorial for information on other commands.

6.4 Running Jobs

Running jobs are those jobs currently executing, including your current TSO session. Use the prefix command B to browse (view) the output of a running job or C to cancel it. The command is typed in the leftmost position of the IOF line corresponding to the job to be acted upon. (When browsing a job that has begun running but its output is not yet available for viewing, the output displayed may be similar to that of a job which has been cancelled.) Refer to the IOF online Help and tutorial for information on other commands.

6.5 Output Jobs

Output jobs are those jobs which have completed execution. If a job's print destination is Class Q, it will remain in the queue for browsing; otherwise, it is printed. Use the prefix command B to browse (view) the job or C to cancel it. The command is typed in the leftmost position of the IOF line corresponding to the job to be acted upon. Alternatively ,you can enter the line number in the COMMAND ===> prompt.

6.6 Looking at your job output

From the IOF Job List Menu, enter the line number that corresponds to the jobname. The IOF Job Summary panel displays a list of all the ddnames (file names) in your job. The RC column gives the return code for each step. The screen shown here is typical of a SAS job:















To view all the output for the job, type ALL. Most likely you only want to look at selected output files. To look at the output for a particular ddname, enter the line number for the ddname. To view the SASLOG for the job shown above, type 5. To look through your output, use PF8 (Forward) and PF7 (Backward). When finished viewing the output, press PF3 (End) to return to the job summary screen.

6.7 Printing part of your job

Before printing your output, you should verify the printer destination as specified in the DEST column. To route your output to a different printer, TAB to the DEST field for the appropriate ddname and type over the value with a different printer destination. To send the output to a printer, tab to the space in front of the ddname you want to print, type p and press ENTER.

6.8 Saving output to a data set

To save the output from a job in a data set, from the Command ===> prompt, enter

TSO OUTPUT (jobname(jobid)) PRINT(name)

The job output will be saved in a new file named "tsoid.name.OUTLIST" where "tsoid" is your TSO userid and "name" is the name you used on the OUTPUT command. This command will allocate the new file for you.

6.9 Canceling your job

To purge your job from the computer (without printing it), from the IOF Job List Menu, either:

tab to the space in front of the job, type c (cancel) and press ENTER, or

at the Command line, type: linenumber cancel where "linenumber" is the sequence number in front of the jobname.

6.10 Leaving IOF

To exit IOF, press the END key (PF3) one or more times, or type: =X and press ENTER.

6.11 Online Help and Tutorial

Online Help is available within IOF. Type HELP on any command line within IOF or press the HELP key (PF1), and a help screen will appear. Invoking Help from the IOF main menu displays a general IOF help menu; invoking Help while using a specific function displays Help specific to that function.

An online tutorial dealing with all the major functions of IOF is available from any screen within IOF. Type QT from any command line within IOF and follow the instructions given.

APPENDIX A

Browse Commands Syntax Summary

COLUMNS
COLS
COL
Display column ruler.
DOWN [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll downward.
END Exit browse facility
FIND {string} [NEXT ] [CHARS ] [col1 [col2]]
F [ALL ] [PREFIX]
[FIRST] [SUFFIX]
[LAST ] [WORD ]
[PREV ]
Scroll text to a line containing a particular word or phase.
HELP Display help information.
HEX [ON VERT]
[ON DATA]
[OFF]
Display data in hexa-decimal or character format.
LEFT [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll left.
LOCATE {line-number}
LOC {label}
L
Scroll to specific line.
RESET
RES
Remove column ruler.
RIGHT [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll right.
UP [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll up.
.label Define line label.


Appendix B

Edit Line Commands Syntax Summary

A[n] Provide a target line. The lines being moved or copied are placed immediately AFTER the target line.
B[n] Provide a target line. The lines being moved or copied are placed immediately BEFORE the target line.
BOUNDS Display and set boundary columns for editing.
C[n]
CC
Copy one or more lines. The 'A', 'B', or 'O' line command defines a target for the copied lines.
COLS Display a ruler showing column positions.
D[n]
DD
Delete one or more lines.
I[n] Insert one or more blank lines.
LC[n]
LCLC
Convert one or more lines to lower case.
M[n]
MM
Move one or more lines. The 'A', 'B', or 'O' line command defines a target for the moved lines.
O[n]
OO
Provide a target. The lines being moved or copied OVERLAY the non-blank portion of the target.
R[n]
RR[n]
Repeat one or more lines.
TABS Define tab columns.
TE[n] Insert blank lines for power typing.
TF[n] Combine several lines.
TS[n] Split a line.
UC[n]
UCUC
Convert one or more lines to upper case.
X[n]
XX
Exclude lines from the display.
>[n|2]
>>[n|2]
Shift data to the right.
<[n|2]

<<[n|2]

Shift data to the left.
)[n|2]
))[n|2]
Shift columns to the right.
([n|2]
(([n|2]
Shift columns to the left.
.label Define a line label.




APPENDIX C

Edit Primary Commands Syntax Summary

AUTONUM [ON ]
[OFF]
Automatically renumber the data when it is saved.
AUTOSAVE [ON ]
[OFF PROMPT ]
[OFF NOPROMPT]
Automatically save the data when exiting the editor via the END command.
BOUNDS [left-bound right-bound]
BNDS
Set the left and right boundaries.
CANCEL
CAN
Exit the editor without saving the data.
CAPS [ON ]
[OFF]
Set upper case or upper-lower case for text entry.
CHANGE string1 string2 [range]
CHA

[NEXT ] [CHARS ] [X ] [col1 [col2]]
[ALL ] [PREFIX] [NX]
[FIRST] [SUFFIX]
[LAST ] [WORD ]
[PREV ]
Change a string of text into another string of text.
COPY [member] [AFTER label ]
[BEFORE label]
Copy an external file (sequential or a member of a pds) into the file being edited.
CREATE [member] [range]
CRE
A new member of a pds is created from the file being edited. (Compare with REPLACE command.)
DELETE {ALL X | NX}
DEL {range X | NX}
{ALL range }
Delete lines from the file.
DOWN [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll downward.
END Exit editor.
EXCLUDE string [range]
X

[NEXT ] [CHARS ] [col1 [col2]]
[ALL ] [PREFIX]
[FIRST] [SUFFIX]
[LAST ] [WORD ]
[PREV ]
Exclude lines from being displayed. (The lines are not deleted; only not displayed.)


Edit Primary Commands, page 1 of 3



APPENDIX C continued - Edit Primary Commands Syntax Summary

FIND string [range]
F

[NEXT ] [CHARS ] [X ] [col1 [col2]]
[ALL ] [PREFIX] [NX]
[FIRST] [SUFFIX]
[LAST ] [WORD ]
[PREV ]
Search for a string of text. The text is scrolled if necessary to find the string. The cursor is placed on the data line at the beginning of the string.
HELP Display help information
HEX [ON VERT]
[ON DATA]
[OFF ]
Display the data in hexadecimal or character format.
LEFT [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll left.
LOCATE {label | line-number}
LOC
L

LOCATE [NEXT ] {CHANGE | CHA} [range]
LOC [FIRST] {COMMAND | COM}
L [LAST ] {ERROR | ERR}
[PREV ] {EXCLUDED | X }
{LABEL | LAB}
{SPECIAL | SPE}
Scroll the text so that the indicated line is displayed as the top line in the data area.
MOVE [member] [AFTER label]
[BEFORE label]
Moves an external file (sequential or a member of a pds) into the file being edited. The external file is deleted.
NONUMBER
NUNUM
Sets number mode off. (Same as the command NUMBER OFF.)
NULLS [ON STD]
[ON ALL]
[OFF]
Determines whether trailing spaces in each data field are displayed on the screen as nulls or blanks.
NUMBER [ON ] [STD ] [DISPLAY]
NUM [OFF] [COBOL ]
[STD COBOL]
Controls display of line numbers and placement of line numbers in data.
PROFILE [name] [number]

PROFILE {LOCK | UNLOCK}
Controls and displays default editor settings.
RCHANGE Repeat previous CHANGE command.


Edit Primary Commands, page 2 of 3



APPENDIX C continued - Edit Primary Commands Syntax Summary

RECOVERY [ON ]
REC [OFF WARN ]
[OFF NOWARN]
Control edit recovery and UNDO command.
RENUMBER [ON ] [STD ] [DISPLAY]
RENUM [OFF] [COBOL ]
[STD COBOL]
Renumbers the lines in the file.
REPLACE [member] [range]
REP
Copy the file being edited into an external file (sequential or a member of a pds). (Compare with CREATE command.)
RESET [CHANGE | CHA] [range]
RES [COMMAND | COM]
[ERROR | ERR]
[EXCLUDED | X ]
[LABEL | LAB]
[SPECIAL | SPE]
Resets the data display.
RFIND Repeat previous FIND command.
RIGHT [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll right.
SAVE Save the file without exiting the editor.
SORT [range] [X ] [sortfields]
[NX]
Sorts the data.
STATS [ON ]
[OFF]
Determines whether library statistics are maintained.
SUBMIT [range]
SUB
Submits the file for batch job execution.
UNDO If edit recovery is on, previous editing actions are undone.
UNNUMBER
UNNUM
Sets all sequence fields to blank and turns number mode off.
UP [PAGE | P]
[DATA | D]
[HALF | H]
[CSR | C]
[MAX | M]
[number]
Scroll up.


Edit Primary Commands, page 3 of 3

Appendix D

Transferring Files between the Mainframe and PC

If your PC is connected to the campus network, you should have the program WS_FTP installed on your system. This software allows you to upload and download files between a host computer and your personal system.

Note: Any file you plan to download from TSO should be saved as a sequential file.

Double click on the WS_FTP icon and you should see the Session Profile screen. There are a number of profiles that come with the WS_FTP program. If you frequently transfer files between TSO and your PC, you will want to create a "TSO" custom profile.

Creating a WS_FTP Profile:

To create a profile for transferring files between UND's mainframe and your PC, fill in the screen as shown below. You would replace the "saxyz" string in the User ID: and Remote Host: fields with your initials (in other words, use your TSO ID). Specify one of your directories (or A: to use a diskette) in the Local PC: field where you want to put a file from the mainframe or get a file from your PC. Before saving the profile, make sure you have two single quotes on either side of the Remote Host: value. The outer most quotes are stripped whenever you save the profile. After completing the screen as shown, click on the Save button. It is suggested that you NOT save your password with your profile. Then you will be prompted for it each time you select your "TSO" profile and click Ok button.



Note: If you are to transfer files that are named with the Wylbur naming convention, the Remote Host field should be your Wylbur prefix, e.g., ''wyl.usr.sa.xyz''.

Note: For as long as you continue to have data sets that follow the Wylbur naming convention, you may want to have two profiles defined, one with your TSO prefix and the second with your Wylbur prefix.

Setting Session Defaults:

When you click on the OK button on the Session Profile screen, you will be prompted for your password. Type your TSO/RACF password in the box and press ENTER. Then you should see a list of your TSO sequential files on the right side of the screen and a list of files in your selected directory on the left side similar to the screen shown here:





Click on the Options button found at the bottom of the screen, then at the next screen click on the Session Options button. When transferring a file, WS_FTP will use the same file name as the existing file. To be prompted for a filename for the new file, check ( X ) the box in front of Prompt for Destination. The default transfer mode for files is Binary. You will want to transfer TSO files as ASCII. To make this the default, click on ASCII in the transfer mode section of the screen. Then click on Save as Default button. Click on Save button, then on Exit button to return to the transfer screen.

Transferring Files:

Now you are ready to transfer files. Between the two columns of file listings, there are two arrows. The left-pointing arrow is used to download a file while the right-pointing arrow is used to upload a file.

To download a file click on the file in the right side of the screen, click on the arrow pointing left. Type an appropriate file name when prompted and the file will be written to the directory you specified on the Session Profile screen.

To upload a file click on the file in the left side of the screen, click on the arrow pointing right. Type an appropriate file name when prompted and the file will be written in your TSO user space.

Note: You can use CHDIR button to select a different directory on your PC.

Note: WS_FTP does not warn you if the file name you specified for the new file already exists. It is up to you to make sure you are not writing over a file you want to keep.

Appendix E

Converting Wylbur libraries and data sets

Wylbur writes files in a compressed format that TSO can not read. Therefore any files created on Wylbur with the SAVE command need to be uncompressed if you want to use them on TSO. The UND Computer Center uncompressed all Wylbur libraries that followed the standard Wylbur naming convention (i.e., wyl.usr.gg.iii.LIB).You are responsible for converting all other files.

How do you know if a file is in compressed format? On TSO, you can use the Dslist utility (3.4) to see if any files need converting. Enter your Wylbur prefix in the Data Set Name field, e.g., wyl.usr.sa.xyz. (Remember, you don't use quotes in this field.) Scroll right (PF11) until you see the "Recfm" column. Any data set with U in this column is a compressed data set.

You can uncompress a data set in two ways:

On Wylbur:

USE filename

SCR filename

SAVE filename CARD

If the file contains records greater than 80 characters in length, you need to use the LRECL (Logical Record Length) parameter instead of CARD. Specify LRECL equal to the length of the longest record in the file. E.g., if the file is printer output from a batch job, you would type the save command as SAVE filename LRECL=132.

On TSO:

From any Command ===> prompt, enter:

tso wupress

Enter the complete Wylbur data set name. On the next panel, enter a TSO data set name. You are recommended to follow the UND naming convention. You can override any of the five allocation parameters, if need be.

Migrated files

Files that were migrated from Wylbur can still be accessed from TSO. At the Dslist panel (3.4), enter your Wylbur prefix. At the Data set list panel, look in the "Volume" column. A migrated data set will show MIGRAT in this column. To recall a migrated file, TAB to the prefix area in front of the data set and enter hrecall. A batch job is submitted. After the file is recalled, you can convert it with the wupress command.

To migrate a file from TSO, use the hmigrate command from the Data set list panel.