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Forklift Safety

Powered industrial trucks, commonly called forklifts or lift trucks, are used in many industries, primarily to move materials. They can also be used to raise, lower, or remove large objects or a number of smaller objects on pallets or in boxes, crates, or other containers. Powered industrial trucks can either be ridden by the operator or controlled by a walking operator. Over-the-road haulage trucks and earth-moving equipment that has been modified to accept forks are not considered powered industrial trucks.

There are many types of powered industrial trucks. Each type presents different operating hazards. A sit-down, counterbalanced high-lift rider truck is more likely than a motorized hand truck to be involved in a falling load accident because the sit-down rider truck can lift a load much higher than a hand truck. Workplace type and conditions are also factors in hazards commonly associated with powered industrial trucks. For example, retail establishments often face greater challenges than other worksites in maintaining pedestrian safety. Beyond that, many workers can also be injured when (1) lift trucks are inadvertently driven off loading docks; (2) lifts fall between docks and an unsecured trailer; (3) they are struck by a lift truck; or (4) they fall while on elevated pallets and tines.

It is a violation of Federal law for anyone UNDER 18 years of age to operate a forklift or for anyone OVER 18 years of age who is not properly trained and certified to do so.

Employers must ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation specified in 29 CFR 1910.178(l)(1). Every type of establishment (except agricultural operations) who have employees that operate powered industrial trucks have to comply with the requirements of OSHA 1910.178(i). The standard is intended to reduce the number of injuries and deaths that occur as a result of inadequate operator training.

Benefits of Training

  • Improve productivity
  • Decrease downtime
  • Reduce operating costs
  • Receive training cards
  • Reduce injury rate

Course Schedule

09663 December 12, 2014

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Cancellation Policy

If you are unable to attend, a substitution can be made at any time without charge. You can also transfer your registration fee to another course offered by ETI. Refunds, less a $50 administrative fee, will be issued upon request. Refunds will not be issued for cancellations received within five calendar days of the course. The University reserves the right to cancel programs if necessary. In this event, the University's liability is limited to the full refund of your registration fee.

Meals and Lodging

Participants are responsible for arranging overnight accommodations. For assistance you may call
ETI at (701) 777-0384.
Refreshment breaks and materials are included in the registration fee.

ETI offers an in-house training option for this course.