Sport Sociology

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KIN 401: Sport Sociology
Credits:
3
Format:
Online
EST. time to complete:
3 to 9 Months
Cost:
$289.42/Credit (No Fees)

 

This course is a critical exploration of the function of sports in American culture, in an interdisciplinary fashion, with a focus on the contemporary scene.

Most of us have experienced sports personally as athletes or spectators, or both. You are probably familiar with the physical and emotional experiences of playing sports, and you may know the rules and strategies used in certain sports. You may even follow the lives of high-profile athletes at your school or on the national sports scene. Most of you have watched sports, read about them and participated in discussions about them.

This course is designed to take you beyond the scores, statistics and personalities in sports. The goal is to focus on the “deeper game” associated with sports, the game through which sports become part of the social and cultural worlds in which we live.

The primary objective of this course is for you to acquire knowledge and understanding of sport sociology. Upon the completion of this course, you should be able to (orally and/or in writing) accomplish the following objectives:

  • Think critically about sports so that you can identify and understand issues and controversies associated with sports in society.
  • Look beyond performance statistics and win-loss records to see sports as social constructions that can have both positive and negative effects on people’s lives.
  • Learn things about sports that enable you to make informed choices about your sport participation and the place of sports in your community and society.
  • See sports as social constructions and be able to change them so they do not systematically disadvantage some categories of people as they privilege others.
  • Apply principles and ideas of sport sociology to issues in your academic and professional careers.

Coakley, J. J. (2009). Sport in society: Issues and controversies. (11th Edition.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. ISBN: 978-0-07-802252-4

You have 3 to 9 months from your enrollment date to complete:

Each lesson contains specific learning objectives, required readings, notes (and stories) related to the key concepts for each lesson, interactive exercises, and an assignment containing 3 to 5 questions about the topics in the lesson.

For many of the lessons there are videos to watch, so plan to spend some time watching them. For the most part, you will find that the questions at the end of the lessons are experiential activities (e.g., watching a movie clip and writing your reaction to it). The exams, however, are primarily factual.

You may enroll at any time and have up to 9 months to complete your course, or you may be able to complete in as little as 3 months. The credits you earn will be recorded on your transcript in the semester you register. Keep in mind, UND can only verify your enrollment for the semester in which the course is registered and recorded on your transcript.